#Blazerof2016 and tips for tracing Burda patterns

So this week, I finally chose what pattern to use for #Blazeof2016. I’ve decided to make it extra difficult for myself by going for the minimal instructions of the Burda Style magazine pattern from February 2016 issue, and I’ve just got as far as tracing the pieces. It took most of Saturday afternoon but that’s ok because I had an empty house save Phryne Fisher and Jack Robinson to keep me company!

Burda blazer pattern trace

 

The tracing took longer than usual not just because of all the pieces but because I was aware of how easy it would be to miss a notch or a mark of instruction. So I was like a detective myself, scanning the spaghetti lines with eagle eyes! I want this jacket to work so I need to make sure every detail is attended to. It didn’t help that the red lines on the pattern sheet I was following clashed with the red pattern pieces of the featured ladies blouse. This could wind up a very interesting hybrid ‘blouzer’, but let’s hope not!

For anyone who’s daunted by the tracing of Burda patterns – and let’s face it, that’s most of us – the following might be of help:

Top tips for tracing Burda patterns

  • Work on a large clean flat area
  • Use pattern weights or similar to hold your papers in place as you trace
  • Refer to the Pattern Overview to ensure you capture every notch, seam number, slit mark and grainline arrow
  • Tick off each piece in the list as you go
Burda pattern overview
Pattern Overview and Cutting Out list
  • Label all of your pieces with Model No., size and piece description / number
  • Remember seam allowances are not included so write that clearly on your pattern pieces too OR add them to your pieces and mark that they are included*
  • Photocopy the image to file with your pattern envelope if storing separately

*I will be making size adjustments to the pattern so I have left the seam allowance off. It’s way easier to play around with minus SA. And then I will either add it at the end or mark it directly onto the fabric when the pattern is pinned on.

Incidentally, the fabric we’ve decided on is a gorgeous traditional boating stripe from Yorkshire Fabrics. 100% wool, made in England which raises a little smile every time I see that selvedge! Doesn’t come cheap so I’ve wrapped it up like a precious swaddled baby and put it away for safe keeping until the calico version is made good. No chances being taken here!

boating stripe fabric

I really am in the slow lane here but there is a distinct advantage to this. Have you seen how MaleDevonSewing is steaming ahead with his amazing tailoring skills? For anyone else who is pootling along like me, he has posted some cool construction photos and instructions. Most of which I’ve never heard of. All of which I will be employing!

Di Kendall has shared the progress of the lovely striped blazer on her blog and it’s great to see lots more activity from other participants of #Blazerof2016 on Twitter too. Keep posting your progress… I need all the help I can get!! 😉

7 Replies to “#Blazerof2016 and tips for tracing Burda patterns”

  1. That fabric is amazing!
    I totally agree with keeping an eye on the pattern overview as you trace; I forget a notch at least once every time I trace a pattern like this.

  2. Your wool is divinely beautiful–I, too, would keep it under guard until I was 1,000,000% sure I had sorted the fitting adjustments on a mock-up! =) I am not sewing along (my DH is getting jeans rather than a blazer) but have been saving all of Jamie’s posts on his tailoring progress, since they’re excellent and will come in handy one day. Can’t wait to see how your blazer comes together!

  3. Your wool is divinely beautiful–I, too, would keep it under guard until I was 1,000,000% sure I had sorted the fitting adjustments on a mock-up! =) I am not sewing along (my DH is getting jeans rather than a blazer) but have been saving all of Jamie’s posts on his tailoring progress, since they’re excellent and will come in handy one day. Can’t wait to see how your blazer comes together!

  4. The other thing you can do is to use a highlighter pen to trace those outlines before tracing with tracing paper. That way you are more likely to mark up those notches, and transfer onto your paper. Different colour highlighters for the different patterns if you need more than one from a sheet. yes, it works.

    xx

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