Two lovely awards from two lovely ladies…

Forgive me blogworld for I have been a bad blogger. It has been 15 days since my last post and still neither a newly sewn garm nor a promised tute for a Roman blind do declare themselves done. I can hear the tongues wagging and I can see the sideways looks and I feel guilty as charged, believe you, me!!

But I must be doing something right. For I have been nominated for two very pretty awards by two very lovely ladies.

very-inspiring-blogger-award-2

one lovely blog award

The first thank you goes out to The Couture Academic. I was drawn to Kat’s blog pretty much from the day she started. She’s all about quality, with lots of lovely detail in every post. If you’ve not met yet, then hop over and grab yourself a lesson or two in ‘how it should be done’! There should also be an award for fastest ever quilt made up by a total beginner. Check this out!

The second and no less equally amazing thank you goes to CherryPix. I love this blog. Such honest posts, from the heart with makes to match. You must check out the Holy Batwings dress. Great choice of fabrics, so original and stylish. I keep meaning to shamelessly copy her Red Arc Skirt too but we’ll keep that to ourselves! 😉

There are rules of course:

1. Thank the person who nominated you
2. Add The One Lovely Blog Award The Very Inspiring Blogger Award to your post.
3. Share 7 things about yourself.
4. Pass the award on to 10 nominees.
5. Include this set of rules.
6. Inform your nominees by posting a comment on their blogs.

Seven Things about Me!

1. I’m a freelance graphic designer by day. Mostly working between publishers and media companies. Designing covers and insides for lovely books and DVD covers. I sew by night, obvs!

2. My family consists of three lovely children and a fiancé whom I am very proud of. Oh and two crazy cats to add to the mix.

3. I’m rather partial to a G&T but it’s got to be Gordons!

4. I am a devoted David Bowie fan. Ever since I was about 12 years old. And especially when I found out that he wrote a song called ‘Janene’! 😉

5. I am addicted to collecting vintage patterns and fabric. I will never in my lifetime achieve all that I want to make. But I’m ok with that and will try nonetheless!

6. I live in West London and am quite happy about that, especially with the Goldhawk Road fabric heaven being a stones throw away!

7. I have recently found out that I have hypermobile joints. Might explain why I can still do the splits at my ripe old age!!

And my ten nominees are…
(In no particular order)

http://bellemegan.wordpress.com/

http://zosews.com/

http://beebeesvintagedress.blogspot.co.uk/

http://sewbusylizzy.wordpress.com/

http://jotsfromasmallapt.wordpress.com/

http://fashionforlunch.wordpress.com/

http://www.melissafour.co.uk/

http://quietvintagesewing.wordpress.com/

http://www.trashplanetdiy.com/

http://paunnet.blogspot.co.uk/

And just as an aside. I would very much like to thank all who come to visit ooobop! and leave lovely comments and everyone in blogworld who has inspired me. The above list is just the tip of the iceberg. Scary how many I do actually read! I am truly grateful to you all because you have all contributed to this path that my life now follows and to all the joy it brings. I’ll stop now!! 🙂

Post War British Textile design

fashion and textile museum

Today, I took full advantage of my freelance status, ditched the children for a couple of hours and headed off to the Fashion and Textile Museum, near London Bridge, to see Designing Women: Post War British Textiles exhibition. What a totally self-indulgent treat!

The intro to the exhibition:

“Britain was at the forefront of international textile design in the 1950s and 1960s. The art of textile design radically changed after the Second World War and three women artists working in England in the 1950s were pivotal in this artistic revolution. The drab days of the War were transformed by the fresh, progressive designs of Lucienne Day (1917–2010), Jacqueline Groag (1903–86) and Marian Mahler (1911– 83). Designing Women: Post-war British textiles showcases their work beginning with Lucienne Day’s ‘Calyx’ pattern of 1951, featured at the Festival of Britain, and moving through textile commissions of the 1960s and 70s. The exhibition features more than 100 works.

Original artist designs with bold abstract pattern, as well as the use of saturated colour, marked a dramatic departure from conventional furnishing fabrics. This new wave of bold textile designs, helped to bring the influences of the art world, in its most recent, refreshing, and largely abstract forms, into the contemporary home.”

The influence of modern art is so strong in all the designs of this period. Its very easy to spot some iconic inspiration from Joan Miró, Alexander Calder and Kandinsky.

Lucienne Day, wife of Robin Day, was the most prolific and successful of the designers having kick started the ‘revolution’  with her ‘Calyx’ print in 1951.

'Calyx', Lucienne Day  1951
'Calyx', Lucienne Day 1951

Heals, though at first very sceptical, was her first client. The work was considered too modern but the risk proved to be a good and profitable move for both parties. Lucienne Day was the first artist to be credited on the fabric itself.

'Diablo', Lucienne Day, 1962/3
'Diablo', Lucienne Day, 1962/3
'Apollo', Lucienne Day
'Apollo', Lucienne Day
'Good Food', Lucienne Day
'Good Food', Lucienne Day
'Trio', Lucienne Day, 1952
'Trio', Lucienne Day, 1952

Lucienne didn’t limit herself to fabric, wallpaper and carpet design…

Tea/coffee set, Lucienne Day
Tea/coffee set, Lucienne Day

Jacqueline Groag was born in Czechoslovakia and emigrated from Vienna to London in 1939. She is one of the key designers in Mid Century Britain having worked with some of the foremost  textile manufacturers and retailers, including John Lewis, Associated American Artists and David Whitehead Ltd. She also produced laminated surface designs for British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC). The same company my mum used to make pilots suits for!

Untitled, (Traffic Lights), Jacqueline Goag, 1952
Untitled, (Traffic Lights), Jacqueline Goag, 1952
Untitled (Bottles), Jacqueline Groag
Untitled (Bottles), Jacqueline Groag

This ‘Pebbles’ design by Jacqueline Groag is so nostalgic for me. As I stood in front of it, it took me back to my home in the 1970s. I can’t be sure that it was exactly this design but similar enough to generate some serious flashbacks!  My mum had great taste!

Untitled (Pebbles), Jacqueline Groag, 1952
Untitled (Pebbles), Jacqueline Groag, 1952

Marian Mahler was Austrian and emigrated to Britain in 1937. As artist and illustrator she combined both skills to generate designs for the younger, yet sophisticated clientele who were looking to create a stylish home. The fabrics were mostly rayon or cotton and the roller printing process made for fast production and an affordable end product. I just love the birds!

'Bird Chair', Marian Mahler, 1952
'Bird Chair', Marian Mahler, 1952

The temptation to ‘touch’ was too much!!!

'Linear Flowers', Marian Mahler
'Linear Flowers', Marian Mahler
'Mobiles', Marian Mahler, 1952
'Mobiles', Marian Mahler, 1952
Untitled (Sails), Marian Mahler, 1952/3
Untitled (Sails), Marian Mahler, 1952/3

Paule Vézelay was a painter and her skills transferred beautifully to fabric design. So much so that I think a certain Ms Kiely looks to have drawn some serious inspiration, don’t you think?!

'Composure', Paule Vézelay, 1967
'Composure', Paule Vézelay, 1967
'Crescents', Paule Vézelay, 1956
'Crescents', Paule Vézelay, 1956

And I wasn’t expecting to see any of these fabrics in dress form but just look…

Marian Mahler, Linear Flowers dress
Marian Mahler, Linear Flowers dress

dress

I hope you have enjoyed this little preview. I do apologise for the quality of the photos. No flash photography was allowed so they are a bit grainy and really do not give any of the fabrics the justice they deserve!

Well, best I get on with my real work now… the downside of freelanceness!